Amphibious Vehicles

  • LVT(A)1 Amtank (37mm Turret)

    This was the modified LVT2 with the addition of armoured plate and the installation of the modified M5A1 turret and two .30cal gun tubs. Introduced into service in early 1944 to give much needed support in the early stages of amphibious landings they continued in service alongside their replacements, the LVT(A)4, as late as the Okinawa landings. All 510 vehicles built saw service in the Pacific with both the US Army (328) and the Marines (182). Our model has all hatches open. A figure set LVT Crew (Upper torsos only) was designed specifically for this kit.

    • £25.00
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  • LVT(A)4 Amtank (75mm M8-Type Turret)

    The fire power of the LVT(A)1 although adequate to deal with Japanese armour was less useful against fortifications. Resultantly it was decided to fit the turret of the M8 HMC with its 75mm howitzer. Major modifications were required which meant that the rear gun tubs had to be omitted. Although this defect would later be addressed, in the interim additional machine guns were added. Our model contains optional parts to provide secondary armament options. Of the 1,890 produced in 1944/5, 533 formed three Marine Amtank battalions, and the Army, a further seven battalions from the 1,307 they received.

    • £25.00
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  • LVT2 Amphibious Landing Vehicle

    2,962 of the "Water Buffalo" were built during 1943/4 with the Marines Corps receiving 1,355, the Army 1,507 and the British receiving 100. It was later improved by the addition of extra armour and by redesigning the front cab. These were a big improvement over the earlier LVT1 and first saw combat at Tarawa. The LVT2 also saw action in Europe and contrary some some published sources, they were used in the Normandy Landings, at least two photographs confirming this. The British used them in Italy for the Po River crossing and also in for assault on the Scheldt Estuary. Both Allies used them in river crossings in Germany along with the superior LVT4 (see Related Products below).

    • £25.00
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  • LVT(A)2 Amphibious Landing Vehicle

    This was an improved version of the LVT2 with the redesign of the front compartment and the addition of armour plate. Resultantly it was the only vehicle to carry the (A) designation without carrying a turret. Built from March 1943, only 450 were built with all of them going to the US Army for operations in the Pacific, first seeing action in the Marshall Islands.

    • £25.00
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  • LVT3 Amtrac

    Known as the "Bushmaster", 2964 were built in 1944/45 and were all issued to the Marines seeing action for the first time in the invasion of Okinawa. Post war they saw action in Korea, Indochina with the French, and at Suez with the British...
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  • LVT4 "Landing Vehicle Tracked"

    The LVT4 "Water Buffalo" actually preceded the LVT3, with 8,351 built from early 1944. The Marines received 1,700 and the Army 6,000 with 500 going to the British. They first saw action at Saipan in mid 1944 and later with the British in Italy at the Po River crossing and also in Germany at the attack across the Rhine.

    • £28.00
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  • GMC DUKW 353 2.5ton 6x6 Amphibious Truck

    Over 21000 DUKW's were built and supplied to the U.S. Army and Marine Corps. Around 2,000 were also supplied to Britain, 535 to Australia and 586 were supplied to the USSR. Although initially sent to Guadalcanal, their first operational use was in Operation Husky, the invasion of Sicily. Also in the ETO they were used on D-Day in Normandy and in the battles of the Scheldt Estuary and Operations Veritable and Plunder, the Rhine Crossings. In the Pacific, USMC DUKW's were used to cross the coral reefs of islands such as Saipan and Guam.

    • £25.00
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  • Sherman Mk.II DD Tank (M4A1 Early) - Lowered Screen (Optional Parts - British/US Version)

    The British invented the Duplex Drive system for tanks being used in amphibious operations and gave their design to their Americans in early 1944. The US tank of choice was the M4A1 of which 100 were the later Big Hatch type. The Firestone company produced the conversion kits. 350 were converted and differed from the British pattern by having additional struts and a raised splash curtain on the rear of the apron. They later decided that 350 vehicles were more than needed for D-Day and transferred 80 (a mix  of both M4A1 types) to the British.

    36 American M4A1 DDs were used in Operation Dragoon, the landings in Southern France with 16 swimming ashore and the balance landing directly on the beach from LCTs.

    Their final amphibious operation was the Rhine crossing but due to shortages of M4A1s, the British supplied the Americans with some of their M4A2 & M4A4 DDs. A total of 28 of this mixed bag were used in the crossing by the Americans.

    • £28.00
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  • Sherman Mk.III DD Tank (M4A2) - Lowered Screen

    The British invented the Duplex Drive system for tanks being used in amphibious operations and gave their design to their Americans in early 1944.

    The British selected the Mark V (M4A4) as it's engine performance was better than other marks. However, due to a shortage of suitable vehicles, Mark II (M4A1) and Mark III (M4A2) were also converted. The US tank of choice was the M4A1 with a conversion kit produced by the Firestone company.

    Their final amphibious operation was the Rhine crossing but due to shortages of M4A1s, the British supplied the Americans with some of their M4A2 & M4A4 DDs. A total of 28 of this mixed bag were used in the crossing by the Americans.

    A Sherman Mk.III DD Tank is preserved at The Tank Museum in Bovington, England.

    • £28.00
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